Why I wrote… The WingMaker!

The WingmakerBy Lynette Louise

I write stories when I want to share important lessons. I teach when I want people to know what they know. I tell stories when I want them to AHA!

Stories gift you with the opportunity to make sense of your life from within the very fabric of your being. Stories show you things that you may be unable to otherwise see. Stories sell a new perspective.

That is why story tellers are revered and have been throughout time. Stories don’t simply entertain you, though being entertained may be what you think brought you to the theater in the first place, you came to the moment for more than that: Stories clear away the fog and shape the future by planting seeds with which to image, connect and understand.

 

People intuitively know that. So when they feel lost and confused they reach for stories.

 

Marketers and sensationalists use this vulnerability. That is why I suggest you be a clean vessal of higher learning. Reach for stories that enlighten rather than frighten. And if you are a raconteur, create from a higher perspective. Tell your stories with loving care and the intention to create rather than dissolve unity. Otherwise you will end up living in a wartorn world created by the disfunction you were part of selling. Because the fact is, stories sell perspective. And shared perspectives create group realites.

 

When people gather together to watch a movie for example their feelings move in unison. The subtlest cruelty perpetrated by the villian can be viscerally felt, even the little things like an arched eyebrow register and create emotions, the little things that in life we rationalize away.

It’s true that upon reflection the group separates into their individual beliefs and argues for the analyzed perspective of their own frontal lobes. Most people remember this difference and loose their awareness of the ways in which they have been mutually manipulated. The ways in which they were all the same.

 

The critiques and discussions may be very passionate as people try to separate and become indivuals again. Thus, and sometimes simply for this reason, the expressed “thinking” behind the story devices and morals can differ markedly one to another. The believed reasons behind why the antagonists behaved the way they did or what it meant or how the other characters in the story felt at the time the eyebrow arched, are opinion based and arguable. Remembered feelings can be distorted by this recreation of memories, and many will even forget minding when the villian arched that brow.

 

Thoughts which appear to give clarity can actually cloud understanding as people flounder about trying to define the undefinable.

 

The one thing that will surely remain after the movie, is a change in tha fabric of everyone due to shared experience and the now subconscious feeling of agreement and simultaniousness. At the time almost everybody felt and understood that the antagonist’s arched eyebrow was a sign of villainous intent. At the time almost everyone felt as a collective. In that moment their heatbeats and breath moved as one. This samness sublty shifted fundamental beliefs and influenced the future actions of all the simultaneous feelers.

 

Societal paradigm shifts come when storytellers cause group epiphanies; moments of life shaping clarity.

 

If these story tellers (editor, director, writer, actors) did their jobs well, the main thrust or emotional impetus of the movie will be agreed on by almost all. And the future actions and emotions of each person slightly shaped, subtly influenced, universally felt.

We understand in a story that which we lose sight of in life.

 

So, since, I want to positively influence the future lives of all families, especially when composed of people with challenges, I wrote a story.

The WingMaker is about a girl, lost in the story of her life looking to become more than her family and/or her disability is letting her be.

 

This is a story that everyone can understand and relate to, this is a story about the ways in which the attitudes and actions surrounding a person co-create that person’s strengths and limitations.

This is also a lesson I often teach.

 

I teach it everywhere I go, and I go everywhere. I travel internationally, helping brain disordered people shift their understanding and reshape the neural functioning of their brains. I help them heal, I help them understand how to succeed. I teach.

But teaching alone (even when it is directly to the brainwaves themselves) is only half the job. Because teaching teaches one to think. Stories help people feel, experience and see.

 

The WingMaker is the story of a little girl and it helps you see, what before reading, you could not understand.

 

We are at cause for our experience and have the power to rewrite our circumstance by rewriting the characters.

The WingMaker will gift you with the wings of intrinsic understanding because people feel more when they imagine, see and hear; hence this book is rich with pictures, concepts and the music of poetry.

But it will do more than that because burried within the pages is a recipe, a way of healing and growing the brain according to your wishes. You will learn concrete things but you will learn them with ease, because stories help you resonate and the learnings happen almost without your active participation.

 

Now, in case you were wondering I will answer the unasked question: Yes, I am trying to manipulate you with this story.

 

That is what all story tellers do, but you are safe in my hands because I do it from a place of joy.

Best of all, the story is true, if you think it can be.

~Lynette Louise aka The Brain Broad!

 


Lynette is our guest on the next Power Up Living show, where we’re talking Making Raising a Brain Disordered Child Easy. People have always asked her how she managed to handle raising so many challenged children into lives of independence. She says, “That part was easy.” On this episode, she is going to tell us how. ~KG

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